Support home
PhotoVidShow user manual Prev Page Prev Page
Welcome
Quick start
Quick start guide
Choosing an output type
Importing photos and video
Importing background Music
Organizing the menu
Authoring the disk
Authoring a video
User guide
How to Create, Open, and Save projects
Creating a new project file
Opening a project File
Saving a project File
Output type
Output aspect ratio
How to add photos and video to your slideshow
Importing images & video
Adding a blank slide
Rearranging slides
Removing slides
Setting the slideshow menu thumbnail (Optical output types only)
Slideshow settings
Slideshow settings
Disk chapter markers
How to edit and decorate a slide
Rotating a slide
Setting display length
Setting the transition effect between slides
Duplicating a slide
Editing a slide's input media
Editing a slide's input media
Adjusting an image's colors
Cropping an image
Orientaing a decoration
Adding an outline mask
Trimming a video
Changing the text on a template design
Slide tab options
Using a pre-design slide template
Setting the background
Decorating with text, images and video
Adding text
Editing the text font style
Adding images, video or clipart
Manually selecting a decoration
Setting the time region a decoration is shown for
Setting the exact position of a decoration
Setting the transparency of a decoration
Setting the exact rotation of a decoration
Additional decoration options
Adjusting the pan & zoom regions
Adding filters
Adding a border
Ordering the decoration layers
Adding a motion effect to a decoration
How to add background music
Importing music
Removing music
Rearranging the background music order
Making a music track end on a slide
Trimming a background music track
Synchronize slideshow to the background music
Advance audio options
How to add a narration to your slideshow
Recording a narration for your slideshow
Rearranging narrations
Adding a narration or sound from an audio file
How to preview a slideshow
Previewing a slideshow
How to organize the menu disk structure (Optical output types only)
The PhotoVidShow disk structure and editor
Creating a new slideshow album
Deleting a slideshow album
Moving a slideshow
Changing the menu title or slideshow thumbnail text
Creating a new sub menu
Importing a slideshow from another project
How to set a menu theme (Optical output types only)
Setting menu background image and music
Setting menu layout and button style
Setting menu duration
Adding further decorations and altering a menu
Setting navigation button style
Setting the disk highlight style
How to author your project
How to author your project
Encoding with motion blur
How to create a video from your slideshow
Creating a video from your slideshow
How to burn your project to DVD, Blu-ray or CD
How to burn your project to DVD, Blu-ray or CD
Setting the output TV standard
Setting the Blu-ray resolution and fps
Reduce output to TV safe region
Ignoring menus
Including original material on the disk
Setting the disk image folder
Selecting a writer
Other editor options
Editor display options
Relinking project files
Undo and Redo
Un-installing
Contact

Setting the output TV video standard (DVD, SVCD, VCD only)


 

Set the TV video standard to the one used in your country. By default PhotoVidShow will try and detect which country you are based in.

TV protocols used throughout the world varies from country to country. The two main standards used are NTSC and PAL. As a basic rule, NTSC standard is used in America and Japan whilst PAL is used in Europe (including the UK) and Asia.

To look up your country's video standard, refer to the list below.

P A L (Phase Alternating Line)

Afghanistan

Holland

Qutar

Albania

Hong Kong

Romania

Algeria

Iceland

Singapore

Angola

India

Somalia

Argentina

Indonesia

South Africa

Australia

Ireland

S.W.Africa

Austria

Israel

Spain

Azores

Italy

Sri Lanka

Baharain

Jordan

Sudan

Bangladesh

Kenya

Swaziland

Belgium

Kuwait

Sweden

Botswana

Laos

Switzerland

Brazil

Liberia

Tanzania

Brunei

Madeire

Thailand

Cameroon

Malaysia

Turkey

Canary Islands

Malta

Uganda

Cyprus

Mozambique

United Arab Emirates

Denmark

Nepal

United Kingdom

Dubai

New Guinea

Uruguay

England

New Zealand

West Germany

Ethiopia

Nigeria

Yugoslavia

Faeroe Islands

Norway

Zambia

Finland

Oman

Zimbabwe

Ghana

Pakistan

Gibralter

Paraguay

Guinea

Portugal

 

N T S C (National Television System Committee)

Antigua

El Salvador

Phillipines

Bahamas

Ecuador

Puerto Rico

Barbados

Guam

Saipan

Barbuda

Guatemala

Samoa

Belize

Haiti

South Korea

Bermuda

Honduras

Saint Kitts

Bolivia

Jamaica

Saint Lucia

Burma

Japan

Saint Vincent

Cambodia

Mexico

Surinam

Canada

Midway Islands

Taiwan

Cayman Islands

Netherland Antilles

Tobago

Chile

Nicaragua

Trinidad

Colombia

North Mariana Island

United States

Costa Rica

Panama

Venezuela

Cuba

Peru

Virgin Islands

 

Note: It is also worth noting that most modern PAL based TV’s can actually accept a NTSC signal (this is not necessarily true for the other way round)

The reason you may not be able to play a NTSC DVD on a PAL DVD player is not because it can’t play a NTSC Movie, but because the DVD will contain a different region code than that of the player. A region code is a technique used by the movie business to make a DVD be only playable in a certain ‘region’ of the world. (see DVD regions). PhotoVidShow authors region free DVD's which can be played on any DVD player. (i.e. it’s then just a matter if the TV can accept the signal).

Tip:If you are trying to author a PAL disk from a slideshow which contains video files which have 23.976fps or 29.97fps (fps=frames per second), it may actually be worth using NTSC instead of PAL. PAL works at 25fps whilst NTSC works at 29.97fps. PhotoVidShow would have to do a frame rate conversion to convert from NTSC to PAL which could produce slightly jerky output. As many PAL based TV’s can accept NTSC it would then be obvious to author the disk as NTSC instead.

To complicate things further NTSC works at 29.97fps but many movies will be recorded at 24fps. To do a good frame rate conversion, a common technique is to slow down the movie by 0.1% to 23.976fps which then divides nicely into 29.97, so all you need to do is repeat the occasional frame. This technique is known as Telecine. To save space on a DVD instead of repeating frames you can store the video at 23.976fps and tell the DVD player to repeat frames when it actually plays the DVD. This is known as doing 3:2 or 2:3 pulldown. PhotoVidShow will automatically author disks like this when it detects NTSC slideshows which contain 23.976fps videos. (Note: 3:2 pulldown is not used on PAL based DVD's). See the following web site to learn more Telecine & 3:2 pulldown.

Converted from CHM to HTML with chm2web Pro 2.85 (unicode)